Knott’s Crossing, Katherine

Historical Sites and Heritage Locations

Established in the early 1870s, the original township consisted of a shanty pub and the Overland Telegraph Line Repeater Station. By 1888, the township had grown to include a hotel, general store and police station as well as the Overland Telegraph Line Repeater Station.

In 1916, under government policy of restricting the supply of liquor in the NT, the hotel at Knott’s Crossing lost its licence and the general store granted a ‘gallon licence’. The Gallon Licence Store operated until 1942 when Katherine was bombed during World War II. A bomb fell in the vicinity and killed one person. Its crater remains today.

The Crossing was named after Frederick George Knott and his wife Kate who were the first people to farm the north side of the river. They ran the Gallon Licence Store from 1927 until 1935. After George’s death, Kate ran the store from 1935 until 1948.

Three boab trees, which are over 100 years old, were planted by Tom Pearce with seeds from Bradshaw’s Run. This site has the primary heritage value and the associated physical elements contribute to make this place of major social significance to the Katherine region and the Northern Territory generally.

Facilities

Picnic Area

Activities

Walks

Disabled Assistance

Caters for hearing impairment Caters for limited mobility Caters for vision impairment

Nearby Things to Do

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Railway Bridge now used as a bike & pedestrian path.

Katherine Railway Trestle Bridge

Katherine

Hunter House from the side.

WWII Hunter House

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Cemetery site defined by a concrete kerb and steel fence. A shade shelter is provided outside the cemetery to the west.

Emungalan Cemetery

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Tom Curtain

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Steam traine & bioler with commemorative plaque

North Australia Railway Memorial

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Didgeridoo playing

Top Didj Cultural Experience

Lansdowne, Katherine

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